Liepaja Rainis Secondary School No. 6 opens the largest 3D printing class in the Baltics

Liepaja Rainis Secondary School No. 6 opens the largest 3D printing class in the Baltics

Liepaja Rainis Secondary School No. 6, which calls it itself ‘’Different School’’ carries on with following time, by implementing modern day technology. This week the school opened the biggest 3D printing classroom in the Baltics. To acquire this equipment, the school received Liepajas council support allowing students to learn new skills in 3D modelling as well as printing out 3D prototypes and design objects. The creation of this modern classroom costed around 37 thousand euros.

Liepaja Rainis Secondary School No. 6 domestic science teacher Lāsma Gustovska teaches the older class students domestic science technologies as well as 3D design, thus leading to actual 3D printing. She had to start with the very basics, as students had very little knowledge in 3D designing.
 
‘’We have gone so far in three months, that students are able to produce 3D objects. Various learnings are combined – material technology, mathematics, especially geometry.’’ Lāsma Gustovska reveals, that the printers are also used by other subject teachers, for example Latvian language.
 
‘’It was the Latvian language teachers idea; students would design 3D Latvian signs. There have been already first attempts in printing them.’’ Demian from year 8 says, that learning the basics and getting to know 3D printing was not easy.
‘’It was not easy as I had never done anything like that. It was difficult, yet interesting, I have already printed out rolling dices and other things.’’
 
The schools director Kārlis Strautiņš believes that it is another step forwards to a modern day education system. Liepaja Rainis Secondary School No. 6 has actively been bringing in new technologies as well as a different approach to education.
 
‘’From year 7 we have planned to transform subjects from ‘’Domestic science and technologies’’ to ‘’Design and technologies’’, where domestics science classes will not involve knitting socks anymore, but creating shoe designs, but boys will create functional remote controlled cars or drones. During Secondary School we will go even further, combining it with animation, 3D prototyping, drone control and so on, which will be offered as addition educational opportunities,’’ is what the director has hoped to achieve.
 
Right now there are nine 3D printers set up in the classroom, two haptic devices for 3D modelling, and two 3D scanners to create 3D images as well as 3D print filaments supplied for the next two years. ‘’Baltic3D.EU’’ companies representative Dizis Dejus explains, that tose are the same devices which are used in the world by prototyping companies, universities and architect companies to produce first prototypes:
 
‘’That means, that right now year 7-10 students having access to such technologies are more prepared for the market in the future. Right now a student aged 15 can create a file, which he can to the USA. This is what this digital technology is like and the world is lacking specialists.’’
 
The 3D industry representative claims that this project will unify Baltic country educational centers who have 3D printers.
‘’Liepajas Rainis Secondary School No. 6 will be one of the main cooperation partners, which with their example will be able to benefit the Latvian teachers understanding and skill acquisition using digital modeling and 3D printers in the learning process.’’
 
Source: http://www.lsm.lv/lv/raksts/tehnologjijas/dzive/liepajas-6.vidusskola-atklata-baltija-lielaka-3d-printesanas-klase.a233533/